BIBFRAME BIBFRAME implementation

On 4/13/2015 3:19 PM, Kathleen Lamantia wrote:
> BIBFRAME needs to be rigorously tested and studied to see if it delivers > on its promise.

I agree that testing needs to be done, but still, I think that creating a SPARQL endpoint(s) to provide developers who want to use library catalog data in BIBFRAME, can have only positive benefits.

Of course, there are pitfalls. There are no guarantees that developers will want to use our data; they have gotten along without our data for a long time and may see no need for it. Or it may turn out that the developers will not be able to create anything that their own public(s) will find useful. I’ve mentioned some others in earlier posts.

The answers to such practical questions are completely unknown and no research has been done to find out, at least to my knowledge. Still, I will grant that the only way to know if developers will want to use our information for their own purposes is to provide it to them in a format they can use. Setting up a SPARQL endpoint is not all that expensive–much less expensive than switching to RDA for instance or retooling our catalogs for FRBR-type structures. So I am all for BIBFRAME. I just think it should have been step 1 or 2 of the changes in cataloging and catalogs instead of one of the last, but that is “water under the bridge”.

As far as the “innards” of library catalogs changing substantially, and changing into directions of BIBFRAME, I see no reason why that has to happen–at least, not for a long time. Records can be created and maintained in our current catalogs just as they are today–maybe some minor changes will be needed occasionally–and then exported to whatever SPARQL endpoints the library chooses.

If the idea is to create more FRBR-like structures so that the author entity will be linked to the work entity, the work entity to the expression entity … (it all reminds me of that old song “Dry Bones” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYeQUXXYvK0), then in that case, there probably would be major expenses.

James Weinheimer weinheimer.jim.l@gmail.com
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