Re: [NGC4LIB] The Return of Cards?

Posting to NGC4LIB

On 10/4/2013 3:04 PM, Richard Wallis wrote:

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“Individual pieces of content aggregated together into one experience.” Isn’t that linked data?

No, but UI components such as cards that create the experience can be built and connected easier/better if the data underpinning them is linked.
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As it says in the article, because of the huge growth in APIs and SDKs (that is, individual applications working behind the scenes to give a specialized kind of access and retrieval and do not have to have anything to do with linked data) “is driving the web away from many pages of content linked together… ” into what the author claims will be a type of a card display. This is because mobile will probably be the main wave of the future, so while there is such a great deal of information that can be aggregated together, there is a corresponding loss of screen size, therefore: something has to give.

Even the latest Google update, Google Hummingbird, which they claim is like replacing the engine on a car is mainly about mobile:
“Panda, Penguin and other updates were changes to parts of the old algorithm, but not an entire replacement of the whole. Think of it again like an engine. Those things were as if the engine received a new oil filter or had an improved pump put in. Hummingbird is a brand new engine, though it continues to use some of the same parts of the old, like Penguin and Panda.” Google claims they changed it to improve something they call “Conversational Search”. Search Engine Land has a good review of Hummingbird. http://searchengineland.com/google-hummingbird-172816

Conversational search is natural language, uses semantic technologies and who knows what else but it is obvious that conversational search envisions people interoperating with their mobiles by voice. Google Glass works only by voice so conversational search has to work for it. I must acknowledge that when I try to use the touchpad on my android phone, all I do is type mistakes. It is much easier to use the voice input, even though it makes me feel like Captain Kirk ordering Scotty to beam me up.

I don’t care for the idea of “cards” given in that article in “Inside Intercom” but the logic seems to be inescapable. Smaller displays can only handle so much, just as people can only handle so much. How can the
library catalog adapt to that?

Will the Next Generation Catalog for Libraries actually be a return to the cards? That would just be too ironic!

-309

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