Re: From Stacks to the Web: the Transformation of Academic Library Collecting

Posting to Autocat

On 27/02/2012 15:33, Brenndorfer, Thomas wrote:

<snip>
The report seems a little too optimistic: http://crl.acrl.org/content/early/2012/01/09/crl-309.full.pdf Quote: “While the printed book is far from extinct, many users find the e-book reader experience to be as good or better than a paper book and the digital rights management systems have satisfied publishers.” Contrast that assertion with the news about Penguin Books exiting the library e-book market: http://www.thedigitalshift.com/2012/02/ebooks/penguin-group-terminating-its-contract-with-overdrive/ Quote: “However, one upshot of those talks, as LJ reported, was publishers’ concerns that if library loans become too “frictionless,” in other words, do not involve a physical trip to the library to borrow and return a book, that it will eat into their sales. The desire to increase this friction may lead the recalcitrant publishers to demand a business model in which they will only make their ebooks available to public libraries if they are used in the library or if a patron is required to bring their device to the library and load the title onto the device in the library, then bring it home. This would essentially eliminate all the convenience of borrowing ebooks from a home computer or device.”
</snip>

Good point. In my own opinion: sooner or later, these people will be forced to come around and give the public what they want. While I realize that these companies do not want to see their business models change, that is just too bad–it is changing whether they like it or not. Newspaper publishing is changing, journals, music, movies, and yes, libraries too. Nobody in those industries want those changes, but they are happening no matter what. We can either adapt, which means to figure out what people want and provide it as best we can, or just shake our heads, say no, no, no! and slowly become extinct. The Penguin attitude is exactly the same as that taken by the dinosaurs and unless they are incredibly lucky for some reason, they will end up in the same place. No tears from me!

We can reply, “Oh! But Penguin is a major publisher.” What happened to Kodak? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-16625725 They were much bigger than Penguin ever was.

Apologies for tooting my own horn, but in my paper in Oslo, http://blog.jweinheimer.net/2012/02/revolution-in-our-minds-seeing-the-world-anew.html, I focused on libraries, but exactly the same idea of “survival of the fittest” goes for *all* organizations. Everybody is feeling the heat (or cold!).

-50

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5 Comments

  1. Nathan Rinne said:

    Jim,<br /><br />&quot;Newspaper publishing is changing, journals, music, movies, and yes, libraries too. Nobody in those industries want those changes, but they are happening no matter what. We can either adapt, which means to figure out what people want and provide it as best we can, or just shake our heads, say no, no, no! and slowly become extinct. The Penguin attitude is exactly the same as

    March 1, 2012
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  2. Nathan Rinne said:

    No one claimed private ownership of anything, but held all things in common… so it says in the Bible of the first Christians in Jerusalem. They voluntarily sold all they had, and gave to any among them who had need… And yet, even they would likely to have said that in a worldly sense, the property was owned by the Church – and not the whole world – even if before God, they only saw

    March 1, 2012
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  3. Nathan Rinne said:

    In 1985 Ruth and I were back in Holland – this time with our two daughters. One day, when Ruth was lecturing, I took the girls on a sightseeing tour of Amsterdam. I tried to use a machine to buy a day pass for buses and trams. Since the instructions were in Dutch, I asked two young women, &#39;How do I get tickets from this machine?&#39; They turned out to be Americans. <br /><br /> &#39;

    March 1, 2012
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  4. Hi Nathan,<br /><br />Always good to read what you write. I&#39;ll try to explain my own ideas.<br /><br />First, it very definitely is important for the creator(s) of a resource to be reimbursed for ther work. The problem is that the traditional publication/distribution networks did not allow that, or at best, did so very inefficiently. When publication equalled physical materials (vinyl records

    March 2, 2012
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  5. Nathan Rinne said:

    Jim,<br /><br />What can I say? You educate me good. Thanks for helping to put all of what I said into the bigger picture. I&#39;ll try to reflect on all of this a while before replying again (if I do).<br /><br />Thanks so much! Again, I appreciate your passion and devotion to these topics and your efforts to engage with others and disseminate your ideas.<br /><br />Best regards,<br />Nathan

    March 2, 2012
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