Re: materials on tagging and/or tag clouds

Posting to Autocat

On 25/10/2011 19:55, Dawn Loomis wrote:

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I am doing some research for a project on tagging bibliographic data by students in academic situations. I am looking for material written about tagging in this context and am not finding much. I thought I would ask others out there what they have seen.
All contribution is welcome and appreciated.
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There is quite a bit of work done on “folksonomy” (and plural) which is very similar to tagging. I suggest searching, in addition to Google Scholar, Scirus. Also, the excellent British site Intute before it closes down.

I have gone back and forth on these “folksonomies” but right now I figure, why not? (Of course, in a year from now, I may be 100% against them!) Unfortunately, libraries have still not made their name and subject headings useful in an online environment, and therefore people have to do something. Still, tagging and folksonomies are based on this rather new idea of “the wisdom of crowds”, which is certainly a completely different concept of what the crowd constitutes, from what  it was before. For what it’s worth, a quick look at the Google Ngram viewer for “crowd, wisdom, ignorance” shows that “crowd” and “wisdom”
from 1800 to 2010 are coming closer together as opposed to “ignorance”.
http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=crowd%2Cwisdom%2Cignorance&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=0&smoothing=3

I have mentioned this before, but when I have done indexing of individual articles where authors added their own keywords, it is rather easy to see that the keywords the authors added were much too general. This is also my impression of what I have seen of the popularly added tags, by the way.

A lot of this makes sense because it is unreasonable to assume that a casual person, or the authors, understand either how to do subject analysis, or the wealth of the terms available.

-88

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