Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Re: Foreign language fields in English language records

Posting to Autocat

On 06/09/2011 17:05, James Bowman wrote:
<snip>
I am curious to know how libraries are treating foreign language 6XX fields which duplicate or supplement English language 6XX fields in the same English language record. My undergraduate library accepts OCLC records verbatim, adding only a call number if one is lacking, and appropriate local notes. Knox College has students from 31 countries in its entering Class of 2015. If you delete such fields, why?

https://i-share.carli.illinois.edu/knx/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&v1=1&BBRecID=230480
https://i-share.carli.illinois.edu/knx/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?DB=local&v1=1&BBRecID=231651

I personally feel confounded by what I see but realize my era is over!
</snip>
Well, my own attitude is: if somebody with your experience has trouble, those with less experience must also. Still, I don't know if something like this actually bothers people much today. Sometimes when I do a search on Google and get one of those *outrageous* results, I think that twenty years ago, if I had been in a library and found something like that in a catalog or index, I would have raised a big stink about seeing this kind of stuff when I was doing something serious. Today, we just let these crazy results slide by.

So, with your examples, has anybody made a complaint or said anything to the librarians? I am 100% positive the patrons do not understand what is going on or why those headings are there. Maybe everybody has just let them all slide by. If nobody has mentioned it, these are the sorts of situations when I wonder: what would it take to get some kind of reaction? Would headings in Egyptian hieroglyphics or Church Slavic or Klingon get their notice? Maybe they would notice pictures of E.T. or Lady Gaga, or then again, maybe not. I don't know.

Maybe somebody should undertake this as a research project!

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